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Old January 18th, 2012, 10:21   #1
Cs
 
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How to be Prepared for a Milsim?

I've been searching the forum for a post that has a general guideline for being prepared for a milsim game but I haven't been able to find a post that has been dedicated to it. If there is a post then I apologize for making a new one.

Everything I have read always say's that people flake out as not being prepared but how does a new player get prepared for there first milsim?

I know the basic being get good BDU's, boots, tactical vest with hydration and goggles.

My real questions is what do you experienced people pack?

How many batteries?
How much water?
How much food? Do you bring a cooler and leave it at the HQ?
Do you bring small cooking stoves?
Toilet paper?

Do you guys pack it all in your vest or do you bring backpacks and leave it somewhere in the field and come back to it?

I want to be able to participate in milsim's this year but I don't want to be under prepared or bring way too much stuff that I would never use. I guess it really depends on how long the op is.

Any advice would be great.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 10:32   #2
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My real questions is what do you experienced people pack?

How many batteries? Really depends on how much you shoot. My personal guideline is 1 battery per 6 hours of game time + spare. I find in milsim you end up shooting a lot less than scenario games though. Definitely no less than two.

How much water? As much as you can carry. You can never have too much.

How much food? Do you bring a cooler and leave it at the HQ? Totally depends on the venue.

Do you bring small cooking stoves? Again, depends on the venue. For a multi-day event, yes, I bring a cooking device, along with my own water, tea, soup, etc.

Toilet paper? Usually not necessary, but doesn't hurt incase there isn't any available. A roll of TP is small and lightweight..

Do you guys pack it all in your vest or do you bring backpacks and leave it somewhere in the field and come back to it? Multi-day events usually have camps that you can leave the majority of your stuff at. Again, it depends on the venue. Read, read, and READ MORE about the venue description. If youo have any lingering questions, ASK!.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 11:12   #3
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Everything depends on the length of the game, and what kind of game environment it is.

Figure out how long the game is going to be and in what sort of environment it is, then predict it from there. Generally people bring backpacks, rucksacks, and duffle backs and drop them in a semi-secured area somewhere in the rear (wherever you respawn). This is going to be your administration/sleeping/eating area. Invest in a good rucksack or large daybag. If you're on a budget I recommend an ALICE pack or CF 82 Pattern Rucksack. Both can be found for under 100$, sometimes under 50$. I recommend something with an external frame.

Lets say you have a 24 hour game in a woodland environment on a large field. Given the size of the field and the fact its woodland, you probably wont shoot as much as you did on a smaller, urban field (like PRZ in picton AKA Rhino) so you may not need as many batteries. It also depends on what kind of battery you've got.. are you using 800mah minis or 5000mah large? Given the size/weight of a battery, it is better to over-stock on these items. Bring a charger too and leave it in your car, just in case.

You will need a radio and extra batteries. Airsofters that dont use radios is a huge pet-peeve of mine. Milsim requires communication, it's a simple as that. With guys constantly rotating in and out, its not enough to have a squad radio man. Everybody should have one. How you organize radio nets is up to the commanders/leaders but its a necessity.

Water? This depends on the environment as well. Airsoft is a highly physical sport and you have alot of gear further dehydrating you. Obviously summer months will dehydrate you faster. Another case where it is smart to bring more than necessary. I would go with a rough approximation of 1L per 2 hours but you may want to adjust that. Check your pee. If you are properly hydrated you should be urinating often and the darker yellow it is, the more dehydrated you are. Drink even when you're not thirsty. Its not a bad idea to buy a jerry can and bring it with you. Leave it in whatever base/cp your team has (not likely to be overrun).

Food: Take something quick and calorie dense. Cans of chef boyardee with the pull tab are my favorite since you can eat them cold and quick. Pretty much anything will work though. Granola bars and such are good because you can eat them on the go. I wouldnt worry too much about food since you arent going to starve to death in 24 hours, and you dont want to carry 20lbs worth of rations thats just retarded. Just bring snacks and a few cans of the chef to keep your energy levels up and you'll be fine. You can bring a cooking stove if you want, but its not a necessity. I would suggest it in the winter/fall/spring months especially if its cold. A warm meal on a cold/wet day can make all the difference.

A roll of TP? Yes. You never know.

Sleeping gear: This is up to you. Its not a bad idea to bring a shelter half (tarp) or whatever, if nothing else than to keep your gear you leave behind out of the rain. Remember, all this crap is going to weigh you down. If you brought a gourmet meal, 40l of water, and your whole wardrobe... you are going to have a heavy rucksack (oh did I mention a rucksack is a necessity? youve got to carry all this shit somehow). There is no way you are fighting with your ruck, so you're gonna have to stash it somewhere. If you know you can't stay up and active for 24h (few airsofters can) then bring something to sleep in. I recommend short naps throughout the day. Play for 4h, take a 30 min nap. This should keep you rolling along. I personally recommend something like a ranger blanket or fleece blanket, but if you want a full sleeping bag its your call.

Other than that: socks. Wet socks suck. A nice fresh pair of dry socks and a warm meal can coax a smile out of even the most miserable troop. Also, glowsticks, duct tape, paracord, mechanics wire, and a good multitool. I shit you not these items can allow you to solve about 99% of problems on the battlefield. When I was a combat engineer I ALWAYS carried these items and I could MacGyver just about anything. Summer months? Bug juice. Lots of it. The more deet the better, if you can get pure deet shower in that shit. Dont get it on your goggles or it will melt the plastic. A good goretex jacket will go a long way if it rains too, but if you're strapped for cash any sort of rain jacket is a necessity. Make sure you pack enough warm kit. You'd be surprised how cool it can get at night, even in the summer. Add to that the fact you're perpetually wet either from rain or sweat and you will be quite chilly.


When it comes to milsim, rehearse the whole game in your head. Think about what youll need at what times and pack from there. For your first few games, ask people and bring what they tell you. Once you start to get some experience, you'll have a better idea of what you need and can pack accordingly. When your learning, its better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. I seem to be rambling but if you have any other questions let me know.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 11:29   #4
Brian McIlmoyle
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The most important thing to "pack" is the will to do it.

the question to be answered is how do "milsim" games differ from "normal, skirmish type games?

This is a function of 'Mindset" In a normal game.. it's social.. you go shoot your friends, go back to the safe zone.. take your goggles off, sit around for a bit and then go back into the game and do it again.. it's a game of tag with guns..

In a Milsim you go into the game and immerse yourself into the scenario. You agree along with all the other players that you will remain in the game for the duration. There are no breaks, no hanging out in the safe zone.. you play as if there is no safe zone.. If you get hungry.. you have to have your food with you, if you get thirsty, you have to have your water with you.. If you run out of ammo you have to have your ammo with you. If you get wet, you need to have dry clothes with you, If you get tired, you have to rest on the field in the game.

To be able to do this you need to develop the equipment , gear and experience to know what you must take with you and how you are going to carry it all in order to be self sufficient for the duration of the scenario..

For a "day game" 10 hours or less .. this is less of a challenge than for a 24 hour overnight game.

So the principle difference is in a Milsim, you go out into the game and you stay out and don't come back till the game is done.

in a skirmish type game.. you go in and out of the game as you feel like it..
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Old January 18th, 2012, 12:27   #5
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I just want to say thank you guys for replying. All this information is great.

I don't like to quit or give up but I'm only human. Being that much more prepared just gives a better chance of making it through the whole event.

I really want to go to a 24 hour event but I know there is no way I'll last without getting rest.

At least now I'm starting to get a better idea what is needed and also that being mentally prepared goes a very long way.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 12:32   #6
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I just want to say thank you guys for replying. All this information is great.

I don't like to quit or give up but I'm only human. Being that much more prepared just gives a better chance of making it through the whole event.

I really want to go to a 24 hour event but I know there is no way I'll last without getting rest.

At least now I'm starting to get a better idea what is needed and also that being mentally prepared goes a very long way.
A 24 hour event is not a "who can stay up the longest" event, it's about troop management and ensuring the right people are sleeping at the right time and switching them out with the people who need the most rest at the right time so that when the shit happens, everyone is able to succeed.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 12:48   #7
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Originally Posted by Cs View Post
I just want to say thank you guys for replying. All this information is great.

I don't like to quit or give up but I'm only human. Being that much more prepared just gives a better chance of making it through the whole event.

I really want to go to a 24 hour event but I know there is no way I'll last without getting rest.

At least now I'm starting to get a better idea what is needed and also that being mentally prepared goes a very long way.
Very few people can go 24 hours without rest.

the operational tempo of a 24 hour game is very different than a 6 hour skirmish.

Milsim games are typically "mission" oriented.. over a 24 hour period you may have several Missions.. some missions could be static and defensive in nature, some could be very active, a raid or deliberate attack.

some "missions" may be .. take 3 hours and eat and rest.

overall one of the things that give many people trouble is the fact that you will probably not be in control of when you do what. Milsims usually have a defined command structure that will organize the force and define missions and timings.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 12:59   #8
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Very few people can go 24 hours without rest.

the operational tempo of a 24 hour game is very different than a 6 hour skirmish.

Milsim games are typically "mission" oriented.. over a 24 hour period you may have several Missions.. some missions could be static and defensive in nature, some could be very active, a raid or deliberate attack.

some "missions" may be .. take 3 hours and eat and rest.

overall one of the things that give many people trouble is the fact that you will probably not be in control of when you do what. Milsims usually have a defined command structure that will organize the force and define missions and timings.
So one of the hardest parts is you could be really beat and then the Command tells you that there is no time to rest and you need to complete this mission right now type of thing? or there could be a really cool mission coming up but they need you to guard a trail instead and send out another group?
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Old January 18th, 2012, 13:03   #9
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So one of the hardest parts is you could be really beat and then the Command tells you that there is no time to rest and you need to complete this mission right now type of thing? or there could be a really cool mission coming up but they need you to guard a trail instead and send out another group?
No the hardest is when people are told to sit and watch an important stairwell/chokepoint for 3 hours and won't listen. COMMAND means you effing listen to them! Generally the people that whine about not getting orders at a milsim are thoughs who struggle to follow the ones they are given. Go figure eh.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 13:05   #10
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All the above info is great and will help you out big time to have a enjoyable successful milsim. Take their game advice they're speaking from experience. It will make the milsim 10x better when your ready for it.

I will add that one thing not enough people do is prepare mentally and physically. If I have a big milsim coming up Rhino/Deadfall I will adjust my regular training routine and up my workouts to adjust to the rigors of the all day event at least a month in advance. That means a heavy cardio endurance based workout with a clean diet. That way when most would get tired and or quit early on you can keep going.

Obviously everyone has barriers and will fade later on and need some sleep at some point. So plan accordingly. During a full 24 hour event this will help immensely. You can have all the kit in the world being prepared is great but if your not used to carrying all that kit it will just end up being a heavy burden.

Also make sure you consult the kit lists most hosts suggest and ensure you have everything that solves a lot of problems right there. Many people are game casualties due to those two factors. Players don't bring enough food, water or enough/proper clothing.

I will give specific examples - Rhino: people didn't bring enough consumables and so many people left when dinner arrived. So much attrition cut the squad I had to work with in half. People didn't carry enough water on them in 40 degree weather.
Deadfall - People didn't pack enough sets or proper clothing. It was rainy, windy, cold all night. A lot of people were cold casualties as a result.
Zombies at Picton - People were more mentally and physically unprepared then anything else and left before the game ended.


My real questions is what do you experienced people pack?

How many batteries? - At least one set of spares for each device that uses them. More depending on mission length. My large type battery in my gun never dies but if you use small type batteries know how long they will last you bring at least one extra.
How much water? - 3l camelbak plus extra water in a canteen or water bottles
How much food? Do you bring a cooler and leave it at the HQ? - always a good option if your there with a big group. Pack at least 24 hours fast consumables on your person. Leave the extra food at HQ/safe zone
Do you bring small cooking stoves? - Normally no its unnecessary but having some pre/post game is good. I did bring a jetboil for deadfall it was a lifesaver and morale booster to give coffee and hot chocolate to the team.
Toilet paper? - Bring one just in case

Do you guys pack it all in your vest or do you bring backpacks and leave it somewhere in the field and come back to it? - Pack only what you need in your vest, backpack, base kit.

I want to be able to participate in milsim's this year but I don't want to be under prepared or bring way too much stuff that I would never use. I guess it really depends on how long the op is. - Don't bring any more than you will need you will thank me later.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 13:13   #11
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No the hardest is when people are told to sit and watch an important stairwell/chokepoint for 3 hours and won't listen. COMMAND means you effing listen to them! Generally the people that whine about not getting orders at a milsim are thoughs who struggle to follow the ones they are given. Go figure eh.

This is a big issue. MILsim isn't just about simulating the environmental conditions of the military, you have to play the role of the soldier too. Everyone has some kind of orders to follow, right up to the top generals. As the individual soldier, your most important task is to communicate with your squad leader/section commander. Keep him informed of your situation.. enemy contact, your location, if you are respawning, if you need rest.. etc. If the section commander gives you an order (IE watch this stairwell).. follow it until he tells you otherwise or if you feel he forgot about you (it happens, a commander is busy) use your RADIO to check in with him and get confirmatory orders. Milsim is a coordinated team effort where skirmish is a loose collection of individuals acting on their own accord. One of the most frustrating things as an airsoft commander is looking behind you to realise that 2/3rds of your squad has gone off on their own and died, and then you cant find them because they are in the rear taking a nap because they're tired.

If you're tired, hungry, thirsty, bored, whatever.. check with your section commander. Part of the duties of a leader is to ensure his men are taken care of for rest and food. This is especially true for airsoft where you dont have disciplined soldiers that can stay up and not eat for extended periods. Do not just fuck off on your own. If ever you're out of contact with your section commander or you feel the situation has changed to the point where your previous orders no longer apply, priority one is re-establishing contact with your section commander. If ever you don't know what you're supposed to be doing within the commanders intent, you're in the wrong.

Also, physical fitness and mental fitness are part in parcel of being a soldiers. Nothing drives me crazier than a guy who spends 6000$ on night vision goggles, 1000$ on gear, 1000$ on a gun, but won't spend 30$ a month on a gym membership to get into shape. Mental fitness (AKA discipline) and physical fitness (mainly stamina and endurance) are the fundamental soldier skills. There is a reason every countries basic training consists primarily of discipline and fitness over technical skills. I would take a fit, disciplined troop with a piece of crap kraken AK and a chicom vest then a super 1337 delta seal NVG PTW who is out of shape and wont listen to orders and would rather stay in the safe zone eating BBQ steaks (exhibit A: my avatar).
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Old January 18th, 2012, 13:27   #12
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Also, physical fitness and mental fitness are part in parcel of being a soldiers. Nothing drives me crazier than a guy who spends 6000$ on night vision goggles, 1000$ on gear, 1000$ on a gun, but won't spend 30$ a month on a gym membership to get into shape. Mental fitness (AKA discipline) and physical fitness (mainly stamina and endurance) are the fundamental soldier skills. There is a reason every countries basic training consists primarily of discipline and fitness over technical skills. I would take a fit, disciplined troop with a piece of crap kraken AK and a chicom vest then a super 1337 delta seal NVG PTW who is out of shape and wont listen to orders and would rather stay in the safe zone eating BBQ steaks (exhibit A: my avatar).
hahah so true.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 13:30   #13
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I really want to go to a 24 hour event but I know there is no way I'll last without getting rest.
That's completely fine just sleep in shifts and have someone rotate with you and pull security so you don't end up with a knife to your throat catching some sleep.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 13:30   #14
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I just want to say thank you guys for replying. All this information is great.

I don't like to quit or give up but I'm only human. Being that much more prepared just gives a better chance of making it through the whole event.

I really want to go to a 24 hour event but I know there is no way I'll last without getting rest.

At least now I'm starting to get a better idea what is needed and also that being mentally prepared goes a very long way.
It may be my age creeping up on me, but at about the 16 hr point with continuous physical activity and exertion, my eyes would be involuntarily dropping on their own. At the 20 hr point i'd likely start sleep-deprivation hallucinating. NOT a safe physical condition to be participating in an activity that requires both physical and mental situational awareness. It is a somewhat physically and mentally challenging and demanding mil-sim, but not a bona-fide war situation with "stim's" required in a crisis combat situation to keep the troops from dropping.

I would think that game organizers/administrators would generally recognize this, and will plan around that - keeping the safety for, and of the participants, foremost in mind above any and all objectives of the game. To do otherwise, would be irresponsible and dangerous.

That's my take on it anyway.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 13:38   #15
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No the hardest is when people are told to sit and watch an important stairwell/chokepoint for 3 hours and won't listen. COMMAND means you effing listen to them! Generally the people that whine about not getting orders at a milsim are thoughs who struggle to follow the ones they are given. Go figure eh.
I heard about that clusterfuck.
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