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Old February 9th, 2010, 19:15   #1
Jesse Jericho
 
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Props for "student film"

Hey all.. wow I haven't posted here in about 3 years. Howdy to all that remember me. Anyway, I'm currently working up a script for a film I'm doing with a local club in Toronto. I need some information - I haven't conferred with the club yet, but since I know a few of you are licensed to import props (right?), and a few have worked with airsoft in film productions, I thought ASC would be a good place to start.

The gun scenes will be done with airsoft (no firing, only one shot from a rifle and that will be done in post), and will not be filmed in public view, do we still need an armorer or someone licensed to oversee something like this?

If so, is there anyone reading this in Toronto with the right credentials who would like to help out? We could pay you with a beer and a burger or something like that, or if that isn't enough I'm sure something could be worked out.

Once I find out more about this, I'm hoping someone will donate the pieces I need - a rifle w/ optics, a pair of binoculars and a pistol w/ suppressor.
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Old February 9th, 2010, 19:23   #2
ShelledPants
 
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If you're going to be filming outdoors in public, you will need:

Permission from the city.
Police overseeing the production (1 cop costs around $250 an hour).
An Armorer.

Anything less and you might as well do it gorilla style, out of the public eye.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 00:26   #3
SultanOfShwing
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelledPants View Post
If you're going to be filming outdoors in public, you will need:

Permission from the city.
Police overseeing the production (1 cop costs around $250 an hour).
An Armorer.

Anything less and you might as well do it gorilla style, out of the public eye.
Gorilla style? Like dressing up in gorilla suits and shooting airsoft guns in front of a camera? Sounds like a good movie.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 06:01   #4
Savage Haggis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse Jericho View Post
Hey all.. wow I haven't posted here in about 3 years. Howdy to all that remember me. Anyway, I'm currently working up a script for a film I'm doing with a local club in Toronto. I need some information - I haven't conferred with the club yet, but since I know a few of you are licensed to import props (right?), and a few have worked with airsoft in film productions, I thought ASC would be a good place to start.

The gun scenes will be done with airsoft (no firing, only one shot from a rifle and that will be done in post), and will not be filmed in public view, do we still need an armorer or someone licensed to oversee something like this?

If so, is there anyone reading this in Toronto with the right credentials who would like to help out? We could pay you with a beer and a burger or something like that, or if that isn't enough I'm sure something could be worked out.

Once I find out more about this, I'm hoping someone will donate the pieces I need - a rifle w/ optics, a pair of binoculars and a pistol w/ suppressor.
Go to the man who knows:

NOTE: This version is OLD, current amendments include, but are not limited to the following:
1.) All film productions, regardless of scope or scale, in Canada, using firearms, whether real, or imitation, working, modified, or non functional, are required to have (A) a licensed & certified Props Person in possession of a Canadian Business Firearms License as per Federal Regulations, or (B) a licensed & certified Firearms Coordinator (Armorer) per IATSE & SHAPE regulations for film productions.


The Section 21 Health and Safety Advisory Committee Safety Guidelines for the Film and Television Industry in Ontario

http://www.filmsafety.ca/guidelines.html#G18

Quote:
GUIDELINE NO. 18
USE OF FIREARMS

GENERAL
Guns are dangerous and should be treated as loaded at all times.
Live ammunition should NEVER be used.
Under no circumstances should a gun be pointed at anyone, including yourself, especially those loaded with blank ammunition.
Never indulge in horseplay while in charge of, or responsible for, any weapon.
A "No Smoking" rule should apply to any area where ammunition or powder is stored, and signs to this effect posted.
All pertinent federal and provincial laws and regulations should be applied to the transportation and handling of weapons/ammunition/powder.
Please note that for the purpose of this bulletin, the words "gun" and "weapon" may be considered interchangeable.
All weapons on a set should be in the care and charge of the designated handler (Weapons Handler) who should be:
in possession of a valid Firearms Acquisition Certificate, Permit to Carry a Restricted Weapon, and a Weapons Specialist Permit (for use in the motion picture industry under Bill C68, the new Canadian Firearms Act);
be familiar with any weapons being used, and their safety requirements;
be familiar with the loading and unloading procedures for such weapons; and
be familiar with the applicable laws and regulations concerning the handling, transportation and storing of any blank ammunition, powder, etc., which may be required.
NOTE: A restricted weapon is one which has been manufactured to fire live ammunition. A restricted weapon which has been modified by a qualified Gunsmith is still a restricted weapon. A firearm which has been manufactured to fire blanks only is not a restricted firearm but should be treated as if it was.
Practical weapons should not be used where a replica would suffice.
Only a gun that has been manufactured for this purpose, and built accordingly by qualified personnel, should be used to fire a charge.

No gun that is to be fired should be modified in any way, unless this has been done by a qualified Gunsmith with the approval of the manufacturer.

No gun should be modified except as described in b).

The Handler is to be responsible for:
Checking weapons before and after each use;
Cleaning the weapons daily;
Keeping a daily inventory of weapons in their care; and
Making sure that any legal requirements regarding the storage and use of weapons and ammunition are complied with at all times.
Never fire a gun with dirt, sand or any unapproved blockage in the barrel.
Never put a weapon down in such a way that dirt or sand might cause a blockage.

In the event of a misfire or jam, no one other than the Handler should attempt any remedy. If the Handler is unsure as to what is causing the problem, the weapon should be taken out of use until such time as the cause can be determined. The weapon should not be used again until the Handler informs the Director or Producer that it is safe to do so.

HANDLING OF GUNS ON SET

Any gun brought onto the set should be registered with, and placed in the care of, the Handler.
Any gun not immediately required on set should be secured under lock and key by the Handler.

Guns should be removed from Actors or Stunt People between takes wherever possible and kept in a safe place.

The Handler should be allowed time to fulfill the following:
To discuss with the Directors and A.D.s how any weapons might be used in a particular scene;
To point out any safety requirements needed; and
To make sure that any Actor or Stuntperson using the weapons is fully aware of the safety rules for the handling and firing of such weapons.
NOTE: No crew or other "off camera" personnel should be in the vicinity of a gun being fired without the minimum protection of safety goggles and ear plugs. Shatterproof clear plastic shield should be placed between any camera crew and a fired weapon which is directed toward or in the direction of the camera.

It should be the responsibility of only the Handler to load and unload weapons. If this is unreasonable, e.g., in the case of large numbers, then the Handler may designate assistants to assist, under his or her supervision, the handling, loading and unloading of weapons.
NOTE: These assistants should be chosen only by the Handler who should have adequate time to familiarize them with the procedures expected of them and the safe handling of the weapons and ammunition in question.

Only the appropriate type of blank ammunition should be used. Ammunition made specifically for theatrical use should be obtained in the correct load for the effect required.
In the event crimped blanks are used they should only be commercially manufactured and never reloaded. When crimped blanks are used consideration should be given to the following safety precautions:

shatterproof clear plastic shield
eye and ear protection
sound blankets over camera, operator and focus puller.
Shot gun popper loads or dog training loads should not be used as they may contain wads that become projectiles and may cause injury. Only those blanks specifically designed for use in motion picture production should be used.
Factory loaded ammunition should never be tampered with.

Any safety guidelines or specifications, laid out in handbooks supplied by the manufacturer of a weapon, should be made known to and must be adhered to by all concerned.

The crew and other personnel on set should be warned prior to any weapons being fired.
This guideline should be attached to or noted in the safety section of the Call Sheet when a script requires weapons to be fired on set.
If a firearm needs to be fired directly at a camera consideration should be given to locking off the camera. A shatterproof clear plastic shield should be placed in front of the focus puller and blanket over camera person.
Any of the firearms that eject a spent casing should be tested to determine the angle of discharge of the spent casing. Make sure all unnecessary people are cleared from the area of the discharge. When actors, cameras or crews must be in the area where casings will be traveling, ensure that they are all at a safe distance or shielded from the firearm.
Check with local municipalities to see if there is a requirement for an Emergency Task Force Explosive Disposal Unit (ETF) to be present. The Toronto Film Commissioner requires film companies as part of the permit to have gun fire supervised by ETF Technicians.
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Quite the thread; seen the return of Savage Haggis and the end of an empire.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 06:08   #5
Savage Haggis
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Here's the latest version (as of 2009) in PDF
Good for a download for up & coming film makers


http://www.actratoronto.com/download...V_June2009.pdf

The section you're interested in is:
FIREARMS
GUIDELINE NO. 39
Page #125


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Quite the thread; seen the return of Savage Haggis and the end of an empire.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 08:14   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShelledPants View Post
If you're going to be filming outdoors in public, you will need:

Permission from the city.
Police overseeing the production (1 cop costs around $250 an hour).
An Armorer.

Anything less and you might as well do it gorilla style, out of the public eye.
ya... its about $60-70 an hour for a minimum of 4 hours.....
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Old February 11th, 2010, 23:10   #7
LightBulb
 
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What is this club called that your a part of?
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Old February 12th, 2010, 04:01   #8
Jesse Jericho
 
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Toronto Filmmaker's Club
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