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Old January 9th, 2011, 17:07   #1
Pyrohair
 
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Join Date: May 2010
Location: Georgetown, ON
D19-13-2 Clarification

Can anyone help me out interpreting this one? I have come by an excerpt from the D19-13-2 Document and I got to the part about Uncontrolled firearms. After giving it a good read over it seems to me like airsoft guns are not illegal? This doesnt make sense to me as you cant ship airsoft guns over the borders yet... So why is this so confusing?! Can anyone help me clarify what this means?

Excerpt:

“Uncontrolled” firearms
5. “Uncontrolled” firearms are those devices that, although falling within the definition of a firearm in the Criminal Code, are exempt from specific legal requirements of the Firearms Act and its regulations, as well as from other legislative provisions. “Uncontrolled” firearms do not fall under Tariff item No. 9898.00.00, and are generally admissible into Canada. “Uncontrolled” firearms should not be subdivided into any of the non-restricted, restricted, or prohibited classes. The following types of firearms are deemed “uncontrolled”:
(a) Antique firearms – The term “antique firearm” means:
(i) any firearm manufactured before 1898 that was not designed to discharge rim-fire or centre-fire ammunition and that has not been redesigned to discharge such ammunition; or
(ii) any firearm that is prescribed to be an antique firearm as listed in the Regulations Prescribing Antique Firearms.
Note: Reproductions of all types of antique handguns are considered “controlled” firearms unless the reproduction itself meets the definition of antique firearm (see above). If it is not possible to precisely determine whether a firearm is an antique firearm, consult the section entitled “controlled” firearms.
(b) Flare, blank, rivet and industrial guns – Any device that is designed exclusively for signalling, for notifying of distress, or for firing blank cartridges or for firing stud cartridges, explosive-driven rivets or other industrial projectiles, provided that the importer intends to use it only for the purpose for which it is designed.
(c) Slaughter, tranquilizing and line-throwing guns – Any device that is designed exclusively for the slaughtering of domestic animals, the tranquilizing of animals, or the discharging of projectiles with lines attached to them, provided that the importer intends to use it only for the purpose for which it is designed.
(d) Low muzzle velocity/energy guns – Any barrelled weapon that is not designed or adapted to discharge projectiles at a muzzle velocity exceeding 152.4 metres per second (500 feet per second) and at a muzzle energy exceeding 5.7 Joules, or to discharge projectiles that are designed or adapted to attain a velocity exceeding 152.4 metres per second (500 feet per second) and an energy exceeding 5.7 Joules. Both thresholds of 152.4 mps and 5.7 Joules must be exceeded for the firearm to be considered “controlled”. This requirement exempts firearms that fire below the threshold velocity with a standard projectile, but exceed the threshold velocity when fired with a high-velocity projectile.
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